posts tagged with: starforger

Index Palette Shader

Index Palette Shader
A few months ago I made and released a game jam game that featured a cool shader based off of Dan Fessler's HD Index Painting tutorial. The idea is to take a normal image and render it with an extremely limited palette. Essentially it's like a game boy shader, and with the help of a dither map texture it actually creates the illusion that there are more colors than there actually are.

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The game jam version of the shader was rather clunky, and required the game to manually render a dither texture over the entire screen. Yesterday I spent some time figuring out how to apply the dither directly in the shader itself to make it more general purposed. Here's the entire shader:
#version 130
uniform sampler2D texture; // The main input texture (the screen.)
uniform sampler2D palette; // The palette texture.
uniform float shift; // The shift amount on the palette texture.
uniform float offset; // The offset for the random noise generation.
uniform float screenScale; // The current scale of the screen. (1x, 2x, etc)
uniform vec2 screenSize; // The size of the core game screen (320 x 240)
uniform float noiseAlpha; // The amount of alpha the noise should have.

// A weird way to generate a random number with a vec2 seed.
float rand(vec2 co){
return fract(sin(dot(co.xy ,vec2(12.9898,78.233))) * 43758.5453);
}

void main() {
// The size of the game window.
vec2 screenSizeScaled = screenScale * screenSize;
// The pixel coordinate being operated on.
vec2 pixpos = gl_TexCoord[0].xy;

// Get dither pixel
vec2 overlayCoord = floor(gl_FragCoord.xy / screenScale);
// Get 1 or 0 based on the pixel location.
float overlayPixelColor = mod(overlayCoord.x + overlayCoord.y, 2);
// Dither is black and white every other pixel.
vec4 overlayPixel = vec4(overlayPixelColor, overlayPixelColor, overlayPixelColor, 1);

// Scale the frag position to match the screen scale
vec2 scaledpos = floor(pixpos * screenSizeScaled);
// Adjust the position based on the scale of the screen.
scaledpos -= mod(scaledpos, screenScale);
// Convert back to 0 - 1 coordinate space.
scaledpos /= screenSizeScaled;

// Get base color.
vec4 pixcol = texture2D(texture, pixpos);

// Mix dither texture.
pixcol = mix(pixcol, overlayPixel, 0.1);

// Determine the brightness of the pixel in a dumb way.
float gray = (pixcol.r + pixcol.g + pixcol.b) / 3;

// Round it to the nearest 0.25.
gray = round(gray / 0.25) * 0.25;

// Add some noise.
gray += (rand(scaledpos + offset) * 2 - 1) * noiseAlpha;

// Map the palette to the pixel based on the brightness and shift.
pixcol = texture2D(palette, vec2(gray, shift));

// Multiply through the gl_Color for final output.
gl_FragColor = pixcol * gl_Color;
}

The shader does require a 2d texture for the palette itself. For this game the palette I used was this:

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The "shift" uniform in the shader determines the Y coordinate to sample the palette on. A shift of 0 will sample the top most Y, and a shift of 1 will sample the bottom most. You can use this to dynamically change the palette during the game.

The shader needs to have the "screenScale" uniform set to the current scale of the screen. This will make sure that the pixel size is corrected for the dither and the noise. The shader also needs to know the "screenSize" in order for the noise pixels to be the correct size. You can also just set the "noiseAlpha" to 0 if you don't want any of that stuff to show up.

To make the noise change every update the "offset" value should be set to a random float 0 - 1 every update.

Here's what the game looks like without the shader:

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And turning on the shader:

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Neat!

Game Jam Procedural Generation Part IV

Game Jam Procedural Generation Part IV
The final part of this series about procedural generation for Starforger II will conclude with the last of the level generation code. In the last episode I talked about some of the details in generating rooms, tunnels, and other details in the level. In this final part I'll wrap it up by talking about how I place enemies, breakable blocks, and some final touches on the treasure room.

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The next thing in the generation of the level is the breakable blocks. These are blocks that the player can blow up using their bombs. I added these sort of at the last minute of the jam just to give some more interaction with the world, and it felt kinda fun to forge your own path through a big section of breakable blocks.

// put breakable blocks in random places I dunno
for (var yy = 10; yy < grid.TileRows; yy++) {
for (var xx = 0; xx < grid.TileColumns; xx++) {
if (CheckRect(xx, yy, 2, 2)) {
continue;
}
if (Rand.Chance(config.BreakableChance)) {
if (breakables < breakablesMax) {
Scene.Add(new BreakableBlock(xx * 16, yy * 16));
gridBreakable.SetRect(xx, yy, 2, 2);
breakables++;
}
if (config.Width > 1500) {
xx++;
}
if (config.Width > 1000) {
xx++;
}
}
}
}

I actually use a separate grid "gridBreakable" to keep track of where I've already placed blocks. This is less expensive in Otter. The alternative would be to do a collision check against all other breakable blocks which would take longer and longer if there are more breakable blocks being added. Whenever a block is added I add a 2 x 2 rectangle to the gridBreakable grid, and the function CheckRect() will check against the breakable grid and the ground grid, so I can't accidentally place a breakable block in the ground, or overlapping another breakable block.

Game Jam Procedural Generation Part III

Game Jam Procedural Generation Part III
In the last episode of Game Jam Procedural Generation I talked a lot about generating the base of the platforming level in Starforger II, and carving out rooms into the ground of the level.

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So now we have a basic level that with a bunch of empty rooms below the ground. The next step is going to be connecting those rooms together. To do this I built a quick class called a TunnelSnake (tunnel snakes rule) to dig tunnels from any point on the map to any other point. Here's the full source of that class:
class TunnelSnake {
public int X;
public int Y;
public int Width = 1;
public int Height = 2;

public int EndX;
public int EndY;

int verticalSteps;
int verticalStepMax = 4;
int forceHorizontal = 0;
int forceHDirection = 1;

public TunnelSnake(int x, int y, int endX, int endY) {
X = x;
Y = y;
EndX = endX;
EndY = endY;
}

public void Dig(GridCollider grid) {
while (X != EndX || Y != EndY) {
grid.SetRect(X, Y, Width, Height, false);

if (Rand.Chance(50) || forceHorizontal > 0) {

if (forceHorizontal > 0) {
X += forceHDirection;
Height = 2;
X = (int)Util.Clamp(X, 2, grid.TileColumns - 2);
}
else {
X += Math.Sign(EndX - X);
}

forceHorizontal--;
if (forceHorizontal == 0) {
verticalSteps = 0;
}
}
else {
verticalSteps++;

Y += Math.Sign(EndY - Y);

if (verticalSteps == verticalStepMax) {
forceHorizontal = Rand.Int(3, 15);
forceHDirection = Rand.Sign;
}
}

if (Rand.Chance(50)) {
if (Rand.Chance(50)) {
Width += Rand.Sign;
Width = (int)Util.Clamp(Width, 1, 5);
}
if (Rand.Chance(50)) {
Height += Rand.Sign;
Height = (int)Util.Clamp(Height, 2, 6);
}
}
}
}
}

Starforger II

Starforger II
A few weeks ago I went to a local game jam in Phoenix! The them was discovery and I set out to make some kind of space exploration procedural thing. The final result was a game I named Starforger II. There is no Starforger I, but maybe I can make a prequel someday.

Download


Starforger II v1.0 - Windows (92mb)

Whoa what's with the file size? Well this game has a lot of weird sounds in it, and maybe I can figure out how to get them more compressed, but right now they take up a lot of space.

The game uses Enter, X, C, and the arrow keys, or a USB game controller (although the game is designed around the 360 controller, so using one of those would be ideal.)

Screenshots


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